sábado, 31 de outubro de 2009

This Is It - 2ª parte?

Por Fernanda Gavazza de Araujo

This is it, at least until Christmas, when Sony Pictures is expected to release their newly announced follow-up to the Michael Jackson film This is It.
Reportedly hundreds of hours of additional unused footage are still available for editing to compile a sequel.
A box set is likely in the works, as well, which in addition to the DVDs, will also contain a soundtrack album with previously unreleased musical tracks.
This Is It casts Michael Jackson as energetic, determined and focused during his final days prior to his death on June 25, 2009. No hint is given during the film that Jackson had any drug problems, or that he was less than able to perform. His mood is clearly upbeat. In This Is It, on stage, Jackson is like a kid in a candy store. While performing, he exhibits a state of bliss that is as if he had already died and gone to heaven. That joy is passed on to those on the set, as well as those who have been able to watch the film prior to its release.

Directed by Kenny Ortega, This Is it is set for release from Columbia Pictures in association with The Michael Jackson Company and AEG Live. The film is produced by Randy Phillips, Kenny Ortega and Paul Gongaware. Executive producers are John Branca and John McClain. According to the film, the footage used was shot between March and June of this year, intended for Jackson’s “private library.” The footage from the final rehearsal was filmed eight days prior to Jackson being scheduled to go to London to perform fifty sold-out shows. Although the film solely surrounds his final rehearsals in Los Angeles at A.E.G.’s Staples Center, it offers a bit of insight into his personality. The film shows what might have been had the pop singer not succumbed.

As shown in the film, This Is It would have been the highest tech pop tour ever delivered, and it would have raised the bar for what is possible. The film begins with interviews from the dancers, who describe what it was like when they found out they had passed the auditions, and what they would say to Michael if he were here today. While answering, the dancers, both male and female, are close to tears.

Photos are shown of some of those whom Jackson admired, including the late Princess Diana and the late Mother Theresa. Dressed in a silver jacket and red pants, while dancing and singing to “Dancing Machine” and “Wanna Be Startin’ Something,” Jackson’s voice sounds as flawless as ever, complete with hitting the high notes on his trademark “Oooh’s.” Listening to the sound in the film, it is hard to believe that Jackson was fifty years old.

“It’s funkier. I’m not feeling that part enough,” Michael tells one of his band members. “It’s all for love,” adds, reassuring him, “We’ll get there.” It is moments like this that add subtle humor to the film, and help portray why it was he evoked close feelings with those who worked with him.

The next scene is the press conference where Jackson announced the slated tour. Cameras are focused on the fans, as well as on Jackson. “This is the final curtain call,” he proclaims. The podium is emblazoned with the words “MichaelJacksonLive.com,” which would have been the site to get information about the scheduled dates. The website now promotes the film.

“Wanna Be Startin’ Something” is seen performed in its entirety. With this as the first full song in the film, it is already evident that this would have been a fabulous concert. Jackson is energetic, able to hold long notes, has impeccable phrasing, all while dancing and spinning his classic turns.

The film’s director Kenny Ortega is then seen working with Jackson. For Ortega, the whole thing is clearly a labor love. Choreographer Travis Payne enters the film, and dance routines are witnessed, under direction of Ortega. Some of those working in the production of the concert speak, including the associate choreographer. The moment when the dancers who have been chosen for the tour are told they have won the audition momentarily plays like the ultimate Michael Jackson reality show contest. Impressive dance stunts are shown, including a scene where dancers were projectiles, being elevated from under the stage, then jumping up, in an elaborately planned move.

The high energy show would have clearly brought Jackson back to the top of the music world as far as a live performer.

Dancers are scene working in front of a green screen, and Jackson is clearly giving input. There are scores of dancers.

While performing "They Don't Care About Us," Jackson looks elated, not burnt out. He is wearing a gray suit jacket and jeans. The film then comes to the much previewed, dramatic scene with his blond guitarist Orianthi. Over the speakers, Martin Luther King, Jr. is heard. It is here where the now infamous "Fade out" is heard. Unlike what was seen and portrayed in the news media, Jackson is smiling broadly at this point. He knows he's got game. This is far different than what was being seen in news reports.

A highlight of the film is when it changes to black and white, and Jackson is seen in 1930’s style clothing, facing off with Humphrey Bogart. “What’s he doing here?” Bogart is seen asking. Guns are drawn. Bogart asks, “What do you want me to do? Count to three like in the movies?” This was to be part of the concert. There is back and forth between Jackson performing on stage, and his reappearing in a 1930’s film with Bogart. Black and white footage is shown of police officers, and Jackson holds a machine gun. Jackson runs from Bogart, and smashes through a window, which then bursts, disseminating shards of glass. The creativity involved in the production of the concert is amazing, as if the music would not have been enough in itself. This was planned for his performance of the song "Smooth Criminal."

There is extensive crew. At one point, there is an explosion as part of a concert scene. “What do you want me to do about it?” Jackson is asked. He responds, “I don’t know. I’ll feel, it, I’ll feel it,” he says, offering more humor to the film. It gives no hint to the trauma that Jackson had suffered during the filming of the Pepsi commercial that caused massive injuries and burns to him, and reportedly started a downward spiral due to pain killers.

Michael Beardon, the musical director on the tour gets a cameo. Jackson tells one of his keyboard players, “Don’t change over so soon,” and instructs him on how he wants it to sound. Jackson is clearly conscious and alert, nothing like what has been portrayed of him in news reports. It is a glaring contradiction. Jackson is seen wearing a black leather jacket, a black and white t-shirt and jeans. He is certainly not a puppet. He is actively calling shots and given direction, while also being given advice, input and creative work from others. In another humorous encounter, Jackson talks to one of the musicians, who tells Michael he understands what it is he wants from him musically, by telling Jackson, “A little more booty.” Jackson responds, “A little more booty. That’s funny.”

“You gotta let it simmer. Bathe in the moonlight,” he tells his musicians. Jackson speaks in a different language by using terminology that they instinctively understand.

The elaborate stage sets are state of the art, pushing boundaries of what has been used before during concerts. “The Way You Make Me Feel” is performed. It is obvious that the work Jackson is putting in requires extreme mental concentration. Jackson is seemingly at peak form.

The scene then breaks to the stage having a backdrop bearing the Jackson Five logo. The dancers’ role in the film cannot be underestimated. The routines are amazing, and Jackson demands of himself the same energy and most of the moves his dancers perform. “I Want You Back” is performed. Jackson says, “I’m trying to adjust the inner ear. It’s all about the love. It’s all about the love.” The next song performed is the Jackson Five’s “The Love You Save.” It is another high energy performance. Jackson then sings the poignant “I’ll Be There.” Photos and videos of Jackson as a child are flashed on the big screens during the rehearsals, as well as clips of the Jackson Five performing. One of the clips is from television’s long gone Cher Show. While Jackson finishes performing a song, he often smiles, clearly thrilled with the performance. After performing the Jackson Five songs, he says, “Jackie, Jermaine, Marlon, Tito, Joseph and Katherine, I love you. God bless. I love you.”

He apologetically says, “I’m just trying to conserve my throat, so understand.”

A humorous scene occurs when one of the female choreographers instructs a group of male dancers on how to engage in crotch grabbing moves.

“Shake Your Body Down To The Ground” leaves Michael smiling at its conclusion. Dancers watch, entranced, as Jackson performs a duet with one the vocalists, Judith Hill. The song ends with the two singing a cappella. The dancers applaud at the end. Jackson is glowing. Teasingly, he says, “Don’t make me sing out. I’m afraid to sing out.” He explains, “I have to save my voice.”

“Thriller” is again recreated, as meticulously and over the top as its famed music video. With its effects, the production is in 3D. It features elaborate make-up, worthy of a Hollywood film. There are many special effects. Jackson is directing the performer who is cast and dressed as a gravedigger. The stage is set to look like a cemetery. Jackson is clearly content with the way things are going. There are “dead brides and dead grooms” in the scene, which will fly over the concert audiences. This live version of “Thriller” would have been a masterpiece, had it been performed. At one point during the song, Jackson emerges from a large black widow spider. The song ends with the late Vincent Price laughing.

The special effects, sets and costumes, dancing, musicians and background singers would have topped any other tour, taking Jackson to a level even higher than what he had achieved previously. It would have been exponential. One has to wonder when seeing this film, if this was just rehearsal footage, what the actual concerts would have been like.

Jackson was obviously trying to take things further than other performers had with their stage sets. While artists including The Rolling Stones have had fireworks at the end of their outdoor shows, Jackson’s This Is It shows were to have fireworks on stage, in addition to smog. Pryro was also slated to be part of the show, with flames around the stage. Not just a short explosion, but a good amount of fire dancing around the set.

Aerialists are also part of the act, performing stunts above the crowd. In addition to set designers and special effects artists, wardrobe designers also participate in the film. One of them states, “I was trying to push the boundaries, because that’s what Michael was about.” Unquestionably, boundaries are pushed, but were tragically never allowed to come to full fruition on account of Jackson’s death.

Also included for use at the concerts was a cherry picker, a move that other acts have previously used. In another comedic moment, when Jackson is being lifted in the picker, and is told he is currently at the “low height,” he coyly responds, “Why would you say that to me?”

While rehearsing “Beat It,” Jackson is dressed down in street clothes, brown pants and a red and gold shirt. His female guitarist Orianthi, who hails from Australia, is playing lead guitar. The dance moves are physically demanding. There are vignettes from musicians, including percussionist Bashiri Johnson and bassist Alex Al. Patrick Woodroffe, the lighting designer gives some commentary.

During a performance of “Black Or White,” the cameras focus on Jackson and Orianthi, who is looking very heavy metal in black stockings, a glittery black mini-skirt and matching black leather boots. Jackson wants a climactic guitar solo. He tells her, “Hit your highest note.” He tells her, “It’s your time to shine.” Jackson sings the note to her he wants her to hit during the solo.

At one point, Orianthi and guitarist Tommy Organ are playing next to each other. It is a powerful scene, visually and musically. Stereotypes continue to be broken in this film that features a multi-racial group of artists.

While artists including The Rolling Stones have had fireworks at the end of their outdoor shows, Jackson’s This Is It shows were to have fireworks on stage, in addition to smog. Pryro was also slated to be part of the show, with flames around the stage. Not just a short explosion, but a good amount of fire dancing around the set.

Aerialists are also part of the act, performing stunts above the crowd. In addition to set designers and special effects artists, wardrobe designers also participate in the film. One of them states, “I was trying to push the boundaries, because that’s what Michael was about.” Unquestionably, boundaries are pushed, but were tragically never allowed to come to full fruition on account of Jackson’s death.

Also included for use at the concerts was a cherry picker, a move that other acts have previously used. In another comedic moment, when Jackson is being lifted in the picker, and is told he is currently at the “low height,” he coyly responds, “Why would you say that to me?”

While rehearsing “Beat It,” Jackson is dressed down in street clothes, brown pants and a red and gold shirt. His female guitarist Orianthi, who hails from Australia, is playing lead guitar. The dance moves are physically demanding. There are vignettes from musicians, including percussionist Bashiri Johnson and bassist Alex Al. Drummer Jonathan Moffatt is also among those featured.

During a performance of “Black Or White,” the cameras focus on Jackson and Orianthi, who is looking very heavy metal in black stockings, a glittery black mini-skirt and matching black leather boots. Jackson wants a climactic guitar solo. He tells her, “Hit your highest note.” He tells her, “It’s your time to shine.” Jackson sings the note to her he wants her to hit during the solo.

At one point, Orianthi and guitarist Tommy Organ are playing next to each other. It is a powerful scene, visually and musically. Stereotypes are broken in this film that features a multi-racial group of artists.

Kenny Ortega and Jackson are at the computer, looking at special effects. “It makes me so angry,” Michael says, discussing abuse of the environment. “That’s why I write these kinds of songs,” he says. “Trees and leaves, I respect these kind of things.” In the video backdrops for the set, a rain forest is shown, and a little girl is chasing a butterfly. Jackson breaks into “Earth Song.” The trees are then shown cut down, exposing a barren, dry forest. “Look what we’ve done,” he sings. He is dressed down in black and white karate pants and a black baseball jacket. He is again elevated, riding on the cherry picker. The video screens show animals, fish and other creatures, as the young girl sleeps in the forest. Soon, the dried trees are on fire, burning to the ground. Jackson says, "The planet is sick, like a fever."

As "Billy Jean" is performed, there is more crotch grabbing. The dancers watch in awe as Jackson dances. He completes his dance moves, and notices the dancers watching him in admiration.They scream their applause after a dance Jackson does, accompanied only by a percussionist's rhythm. "At least we get a feel of it," says Jackson. Ortega proclaims, "Church of rock and roll!"

"One may wonder at this point if the music was enhanced. After all, Jackson never had a chance to "sing out," due to his untimely death before the start of the tour.

The band and the dancers hold hands as they stand in a large circle on stage. It is meant to be a private moment, not part of the performance. Jackson tells them they are there to "remind the world love is one." He says, "I have an important message to you."

"Human Nature" is performed, as is the anthemic "Man In The Mirror."

Judith Hall practices alone in a room, then the camera shows Jackson singing the song on stage.

As the film ends, screen reads, "Love lives forever."

Part of the credits at the end of the film note that it is dedicated to Jackson's three children, Blanket, Prince Michael and Paris. The fact that "no animals were harmed" during the production of the concert is also noted. Another message, "Heal The World," is flashed across the screen.

As Jackson sings “I’ll Be There,” while performing Jackson Five numbers, the film This Is It serves as yet another reminder that although Michael Jackson may no longer be alive, his indelible image and trademark music will long survive, regardless of mishaps, death or canceled tour dates.
The title This Is It is a bit of an irony, as when it comes to his countless fans, Jackson mania will never be over.
At least not by Christmas.

Fonte: Examiner

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Será?

11 comentários:

  1. se alguem pudesse fazer uma pequena tradução sobre o que está falando o texto, ajudaria rsrsrsrs

    ResponderExcluir
  2. Em resumo fala sobre uma possibilidade da Sony lançar no Natal uma nova compilação de ensaios de MJ pra turnê THIS IS IT já que eles possuem mais de 130 horas gravadas...

    ResponderExcluir
  3. Tradução, por favor..............

    ResponderExcluir
  4. Se a Sony fizer isso, tem que ser em DVD pq se lançarem outro filme vai ser uma palhaçada em
    tipo: This is it 2
    Afff ¬¬''

    ResponderExcluir
  5. Prq vc não posta mais os textos traduzidos???

    ResponderExcluir
  6. Que nada, tem que ser nas telonas msm, não vejo a hora de TII 2, Michael não queria revolucionar o mundo do cinema?1 Então, quer coisa mais revolucionária que isso?!
    Realmente segundo falaram tem mais hrs gravadas, não ficaria só em 2hr e esse segundo será beeem melhor, ah vai rsrs... \o/ \o/ \o/

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  7. pow, a gente gosta do teu blog e tal, mas textos em inglês tão enchendo o saco, nossa lingua é o português, nem todo mundo fala inglês...

    =/

    Traduz pra gente! *_*

    ResponderExcluir
  8. Caramba, é só copiar o texto é jogar no Google Tradutor... Mas vou colocar a tradução para vcs...rs

    ResponderExcluir
  9. O pior é que quando a gente traduz tem gente que reclama que a tradução ta uma bosta.. é foda! rsrsrs

    This Is Also It está por vir...

    ResponderExcluir
  10. Eita povinho acomodado....rs
    Novidade nenhuma, com mais de 80 horas de gravação do tal "ensaio" eles fazem um filme com 111 minutos, dá pra fazer mais uns 10 filmes....rs
    Tomara que façam, pq pelo que estou sentindo Michael resolveu dar um jeitinho de cancelar os shows de Londres, mas mostrar para os fãs as suas idéias.E correu pra trás das cameras, o que tb não é nenhuma novidade, como ele mesmo disse: "Não gosto de tour, me sinto no inferno!"
    Por outro lado, adora filmes!
    faça o que quiser Michael, nos adoramos vc.

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Michael Jackson está vivo?